The Purge

Sorry horror movie fans, this isn’t a write up on having one night a year of complete lawlessness. Lawlessness does come in handy as a moniker when parsing lifestyle inflation and consumerism though. When Mrs. OG 2 and I came to the realization that I would retire in a handful of years, we also stumbled upon the concept of FI. Along with that came the perspective of what things/items would make the move to our new retirement hometown, Charleston, SC. Couple this with the cliché of ‘Do you own things or do your things own you’, we set out to PURGE our house. The rule was simple: If we don’t use it now OR it won’t be making the move the dream home, it has to go.We Own What?The realization of gluttony was staggering. As part of the FI journey, I cut out the lawn crew and set out for…

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Frugality: Stopping Short like Frank Costanza

The OGs are both feet (well 4 feet) into the FI pool. Going headlong into all of the pillars. One of which is frugality. However, we soon discovered there are certain things that we won’t skimp on. For those, we’re stopping short on like Frank Costanza. One of the regular conversations with FI frugality is how much is too much. You can read about early retirement extreme or some other minimalist sites about how far you can go to cut your spending down to dust.There was even a video floating around the interwebs about a guy who didn’t pay for anything. This was roundly dismissed by the masses, but it does demonstrate how far one can go to be frugal. Maybe eggs three meals a day that come from your own egg producing chickens, accompanied by some self-sustained hydroponic farm would be one of the cheapest ways to feed your family.…

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Only One Foot Fits in a Shoe

OG2: There are some aspects that are universal or indisputable. Such as 2+2=4, the sun rises in the East or one of the kids will get on my nerves today. From the outside looking in, or at a high level, FI appears to be universally generic. ‘Live well beneath your means’, ‘Save 50% of your income’, ‘Get off the hamster wheel’, ‘Minimalism to the maximum’ or ‘Bustle with a Side Hustle’ (alright I made that last one up).. Even though many posts or podcasts advocate that as an individual, you need to pick and choose certain concepts or methodologies that work for you, within the larger FI community this doesn’t always hold true. It could be just a matter that people are much more comfortable extolling platitudes from a keyboard, or maybe they truly believe they’ve lived all lives and have concluded their way is the only way. Even in…

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Sprint to FIRE: The first 6 months on the FI Path

As referenced in our first post, the Why of the FI Old Guys, we came upon the concept of FI in July, 2018. This blog was launched in January of this year. We thought it would be useful or interesting to understand what we’ve done in those first six months in pursuit of our FI paths. Many of the items below will be detailed in much greater depth in future content. OG2: From my perspective, it’s as simple as ‘retain all of your income’. That means stop spending money and earn all you can. This clearly is an oversimplification, but gets at the root of every successive step. Eliminating the outflow of cash is the simplest and easy step. Now, I didn’t say it was emotionally easy, just that terminating non-essentials from a technical perspective isn’t difficult. The second step is assessing your income and debt (if you have any).…

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The CliffsNotes of FI

There are a lot of blog posts out there with all the detail you would ever need to understand the concepts and the math of Financial Independence (FI). This post is designed to provide a quick, easy read to summarize the concepts in play. Again, this is our interpretation and not meant as the end-all-be-all on FI-xpertisness.   First of all, if you don’t know what CliffsNotes are, you’re definitely a lot younger than the OGs. Definition of FI 1)         Figure out what your income/annual spend will be in retirement. A lot of the minimalists or frugal types already early retired are generally in the $30-$40k/year range. OG2 is using $100k annually. Right now this is just a nice round number for me. It will become more clear as I research actual costs of where OG2’s family is going move after retirement. Additionally, we are doing some cost logging this…

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